Modern Flex Nib Fountain Pen Comparison: My FPR Pens

Flex fountain pens provide such lovely line variation and can make almost anyone’s handwriting look better. Most flex fountain pen lovers simply love the line variation from a nice flex nib and don’t do calligraphy. I use mine for modern calligraphy, but anyone who loves journaling, writing, sketching, etc. will enjoy the beautiful line variation from a flex pen.

So is there one single best flex nib fountain pen? I think that depends on a lot of factors and individual preferences, but today I’ll be comparing several of my favorites of these modern flex nib pens. All of the ones I’m comparing today in this modern flex nib fountain pen comparison are from Fountain Pen Revolution (FPR), and they all currently are fitted with the FPR ultra flex nib.

I have a few other flex nib fountain pens, the Noodler’s Ahab and the Blue Dew flex pen, which I’ve discussed in a previous post (toward the end of that post.) Ever since I discovered the ultra flex nib from FPR, though, it’s become my favorite and my first choice, although I enjoy all of the pens in my collection, for various reasons.

The fountain pens in the photo have flex nibs, other than the bright green Narwhal.

In the past, only vintage fountain pens had nibs soft enough for really great flex, but not anymore.

A Comparison of My Current Fountain Flex Nib Fountain Pens from Fountain Pen Revolution

The following pens are my most smooth and flexible pen/nib combinations, of the pens I have. All of the pens in this post are from Fountain Pen Revolution (FPR), my favorite place to buy flex fountain pens.

By the way, I don’t receive any commission when you buy any of the FPR pens, I just love them so much and love to spread the word about them. FPR sent me my first one last year, my Himalaya V2, in exchange for my honest review, and I’ve been a consistent customer ever since.

  • Fountain Pen Revolution (FPR) Himalaya V2 Fountain Pen

My first fountain pen with a very flexible nib, was the Himalaya V2, from FPR. The pen comes with options for various nibs, both non-flex and flex. (This is important to note because the FPR pens can be purchased as regular fountain pens or flex fountain pens, depending on the nib you choose.)

I chose the steel ultra flex nib. It was my first experience with this nib, and I was wowed from the day I got it. I was kind of shocked because I had never used a fountain pen with such a flexible nib before. (I loved it so much, I bought a second one.)

The Himalaya V2 fountain pen comes in acrylic or ebonite, and it’s a converter filled pen.

FPR Himalaya V2 fountain pen with fpr ultra flex nib
flex nib fountain pen with fpr ultra flex nib

The nib size on the Himalaya V2 is a #6, and the steel ultra flex nib that I chose for it is very flexible and smooth. I think this nib is the closest you can get to a “wet noodle” in a modern flex nib.

I have a detailed review of the Himalaya V2 here.

  • Fountain Pen Revolution (FPR) Jaipur V1 Fountain Pen

On to my next FPR fountain pen with a flex nib – the Jaipur V1. Like many of the fountain pens from Fountain Pen Revolution, you can choose which nib you like, flex or non-flex, and I chose the steel EF ultra flex nib for this one, too. (That Fountain Pen Revolution ultra flex nib is excellent, regardless of the size.)

FPR Jaipur V1 fountain pen with fpr ultra flex nib

The #5.5 steel ultra flex nib on the Jaipur V1 has really good flex and is easy to control. It’s not quite as flexible as the #6 ultra flex nib I have on my Himalaya V2 and my Jaipur V2, but still provides great flex. Also, you won’t get quite as much line variation with this nib as you will with the #6 ultra flex nib. This pen railroads slightly more than my other FPR pens, but railroading isn’t a big problem with it at all. The pen looks better in person than on the website.

The Jaipur V1 is a piston filler pen, so it holds a nice amount of ink. I like seeing how much ink is left in the filler window.

It’s also an incredible value. I never would have thought that I could get this great flex pen experience at such a low price. (There are even less expensive pens at the FPR site that can be purchased with their ultra flex nib, but I haven’t tried them.)

Because of the vegetal resin the Jaipur V1 is made from, it has a slight odor that I barely notice at all. (Some people find it bothersome, but if you read the reviews, most people don’t even mention it.) I promptly bought a second one! (I like to keep several pens inked with different colors, and the price on this pen is relatively quite low.) It’s wonderful to write with.

  • Fountain Pen Revolution (FPR) Jaipur V2 Fountain Pen

I actually have two of these Jaipur V2 pens, because I caught a BOGO sale on my last birthday.(Fountain Pen Revolution has frequent sales, and sometimes they are BOGOs!)

In the photo at the top of the page, the Jaipur V2s are the third and fourth ones from the top.

Like the Jaipur V1, the Jaipur V2 is a piston filler pen. It holds a lot of ink, and I like seeing how much ink is left in the window, just as in the Jaipur V1.

The Jaipur V2 takes a #6 nib, rather than the #5.5 nib on the Jaipur V1, and I have used both the steel ultra flex and the regular steel flex nibs on mine. I prefer the ultra flex nib over the regular flex nib (but then, I always prefer the ultra flex. And, if your goal is flex, you probably will, too.) The ultra flex takes less pressure to flex than the regular steel flex nib they offer, and there is more line variation with the ultra flex nib, too. The regular steel flex nib is still nice, though, although much more stiff, and it’s less expensive.

The nib units on the Jaipur V2 pen screw in place, which is really convenient.

The Jaipur V2 is a more expensive pen than the Jaipur V1, and writing with it feels elegant. The writing experience is lovely with the steel ultra flex nib. It’s a very wet pen, and it lays down a lot of ink, so I don’t use a very wet ink with these pens. I hear that it is great for shimmer inks, because of its wetness, but I haven’t used them. (I don’t really use shimmer inks because I hate to have to clean my pens that often!)

I especially love the mottled brown ebonite one that I have. It’s a beautiful pen and a wonderful nib, and a really nice choice if you want a gorgeous piston filler pen with a #6 nib.

fountain pen collection

Is there a Favorite?

So, which one of these pens is my favorite? On any given day, my answer might be different! As you’ll read below, it’s hard to choose a favorite. I love each of them.

These preferences of mine are based only on the pens I have, and these are all pens from Fountain Pen Revolution.

Also, FPR has both less expensive and more expensive pens at their site, in addition to the ones I have, but I’ve only tried the ones I’ve mentioned in this comparison.

  • My Himalaya V2 pens with the #6 steel ultra flex nib are buttery smooth and flexible and so pretty. When fitted with the ultra flex nib, the Himalaya V2 is one of my favorite pens to write with. To me, it feels like a “wet noodle” fountain pen.
  • My Jaipur V1 pens with the #5.5 steel ultra flex nib were a great value, and they write beautifully. The #5.5 ultra flex nib on the Jaipur V1 isn’t quite as much of a “wet noodle” as the #6 ultra flex nib that I have on my Himalaya V2 and my Jaipur V2, but still very flexible. Again, there is a very slight odor to these, due to the vegetal resin they’re made from, but unless you are extremely sensitive, I wouldn’t let that deter you, as it fades, anyway. Because of its low cost and how easy it is to write with, when fitted with the ultra flex nib, this, also, is one of my favorite pens to write with.
  • My Jaipur V2 fountain pens with the #6 steel ultra flex nib are gorgeous flex piston filler pens. Writing with them is an absolute joy. It’s an elegant writing experience and also one of my favorite pens to write with.

You absolutely don’t have to spend big bucks on a vintage pen to get wonderful flex. All of my pens from Fountain Pen Revolution that have the ultra flex nib on them perform so well, I can’t imagine a vintage one could be better. And, while I’ve never actually used a vintage flex nib, I’ve heard several people who have used both, say the same thing.

Linking to:

Thursday Favorite Things, Imparting Grace, Building Our Hive, Happiness is Homemade, The Cottage Market, Create with Joy, Mostly Blogging, Esme Salon, Sew Can Do, Tuesday Turn About, Lou Lou Girls, Jenerally Informed, Fluster Buster, Artsy Fartsy Mama, Crafty Creators, Shabby Art Boutique

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